V-Mac

Vincent C. McDonald Jr. (born September 15, 1988), also known by his stage name V-Mac, is a Bahamian rapper, singer, producer, entrepreneur, media executive, talk show host, philanthropist and motivational speaker.

McDonald was born in Nassau, The Bahamas to a middle class family. At birth, doctors discovered that he had glaucoma which blinded him in both eyes. McDonald spent a great deal of infancy in and out of surgery and doctors were eventually able to give him sight in his left eye. His right eye however, was replaced with a prosthetic. His parents were overprotective of their son and McDonald admits that he was steered to more indoor activities instead of rough-and-tumble outdoor sports. Being indoors however, allowed VMac to develop a keen sense of creativity.

At five, McDonald’s parents gave him a drum set for Christmas. Unknowingly, they had given him the key to unlock what many have described as a “prodigious and prolific” talent in music and entertainment. He taught himself to play and by age eight, he’d organized his first concert on his lawn. Taking the advice of family members and friends who recognized that he had a genuine talent, he enrolled in Grey’s Music School where he took vocal lessons.

Before turning 15, McDonald developed a following, particularly in the gospel arena. By this time, he’d also learned to play the keyboard by ear and was writing his own songs. He began accepting invitations to perform at church and youth events as a musician. After hearing the story of his struggles immediately after birth, he was asked to speak publically in many forums as a youth motivational speaker. McDonald began using the name V-Mac, a juxtaposition of his first and last names around this time. He was also gaining respect for helping out behind the scenes with faulty equipment and seeing the lack of professionalism and organization at some events, he ventured into the production industry.

This led to the official development of V-Mac Productions and Extreme Youth Entertainment. At the time, McDonald was the youngest gospel producer, singer, performer, record label owner in the Bahamian gospel genre – all while was still a freshman in high school. He began balancing the demands of producing events and school with his new found hobby of media and television. The demands for performing and public speaking grew and McDonald also became a role model for a new wave of young gospel singers who combined modern elements with classic styles. Considering him peer instead an old industry head, he began entertaining requests to help launch careers through music production, songwriting, composing and arranging, stage set up and music video production.

After getting all of the camera equipment he needed in place, 16 year-old McDonald became the youngest Bahamian to host, film, direct and executive produce a nationally televised series with his Extreme Youth TV, which aired one new and one repeat episode a week. The show’s premise was to provide teens with an uplifting word and to also take them behind the scenes of concerts, introduce them to the Bahamian archipelago and introduce new artists and music.

After the overwhelming success of his television show, McDonald decided the time was right to bring out his own project. His premiere album Elevation quickly climbed to the top of the charts in The Bahamas and Caribbean and launched him as a bonafide international artist. Offers poured in and he delivered well received performances in Florida, USA; Toronto, Canada; Antigua and The Cayman Islands.

In 2010, McDonald took on two major projects – launching his own internet radio station www.ultimatevibes.com and putting forth his sophomore album The Way We Praise. As of 2011, McDonald’s station broke another record as one of the most popular Bahamian-owned stations amongst Bahamian youth.

Throughout his career, McDonald has made no apologies for his Christian faith, something he credits to his success. He also has given back to the community, particularly to those with visual impediments. He has worked closely with several groups including the Foundation for Blind and Visually Impaired Children and the Erin H. Gilmour School for the Blind.

Last modified onWednesday, 28 June 2017 13:08
More in this category: « Jonathan Farrington J Square »

Leave a comment